MD Courses — Opthalmology and Visual Sciences

First year

Introduction to clinical ophthalmology begins in the first year with a lecture and practicum (peer exam) on taking an ocular history and performing an ocular exam. Emphasis is on ophthalmoscopy. Lectures and practicum session will be led by Dr. John Lind and Dr. Morton Smith.

Second year

During the second year, students will receive a refresher lecture and lab on direct ophthalmoscopy as well as a lecture on ophthalmic manifestations of systemic disease and primary ocular diseases.

Third year

Third-Year Clerkship Opportunities

In the third year, students are given the opportunity to spend four weeks of their surgery rotation on the ophthalmology service. The students work closely with the ophthalmology residents and review the differential diagnosis of the “red eye,” how to interpret an ophthalmologic consult note, and how to handle ocular emergencies. During this rotation, there is again emphasis on the use of the ophthalmoscope. Additional clinical skills introduced to student rotators include the use of the slit lamp and indirect ophthalmoscopy. All third-year students must complete the “Case Studies in Ophthalmology for Medical Students” and attend the periodic “feedback/oral exam” session with Dr. John Lind and/or Dr. Morton Smith.

Third year/fourth year

Ophthalmology Sub-Internship Rotation (“The Sub-eye”). During the month of June prior to fourth year, students interested in pursuing a career in ophthalmology are encouraged to rotate on this intensive four week rotation. Students will have personal indirect ophthalmoscopy lenses available for use on the rotation. Formal didactics and workshops will be used to teach students how to perform a detailed ophthalmic history and exam including mastery of advanced slit lamp techniques and indirect fundoscopy. There will be an intense schedule of both live and recorded lectures delivered by ophthalmology faculty members with post-lecture quizzes. Students will be expected to perform daily required reading. Retention and understanding of reading materials will be gauged by frequent quizzes. Students are strongly encouraged to present a case at the Department’s Grand Rounds. By the end of the rotation, students will be expected to function at the level of a first year ophthalmology resident.

Fourth year

Electives

M50 – OPHTHALMOLOGY

M50 801 / OPHTHALMOLOGY
Instructor(s): John T. Lind, MD, MS, lindj@vision.wustl.edu, and
Morton E. Smith, MD, 314-747-5559 or 314-362-5722
Location: McMillan Hospital, Room 114, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, South Campus
Elective Contact: Mary Carnoali, 314-362-4418

Other Information: All students interested in this senior elective must meet with Dr. John Lind or Dr. Morton Smith in March of year WUMS III.
Enrollment limit per period: 8
Valid start weeks for WUMS IV students only:  June 201

This elective is for senior students who plan to apply for a residency in ophthalmology. In accordance with any sub-internship, medical students will be expected to function at the level of a beginning first-year ophthalmology resident on this rotation. The students will rotate through the resident eye clinic and the subspecialty clinics of the full time faculty of the Washington University Medical School Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (e.g., neuro-ophthalmology service, cornea/external disease service, etc.).

The first day of the rotation will consist of an orientation day in which students will receive extensive didactics and participate in workshops to learn the basics of a complete ophthalmic history and examination.  Students may opt to check-out indirect ophthalmoscopy lenses that may be used for the month to facilitate the acquisition of fundoscopy skills.  During the rotation, the student’s responsibilities range from observation (including observing surgery) to working at a resident level and completing full eye examinations.

There will be a rigorous academic curriculum for the rotation including a weekly case presentation to Dr. John Lind or Dr. Morton Smith, bi-monthly wet lab sessions with a resident, weekly attendance at grand rounds, and a mix of medical student-oriented and resident-oriented conferences.

On day one, students will receive a rotating call schedule for the entire month.  A medical student is expected to be present at all times to assist the primary call ophthalmology resident during the rotation.  By the end of the four-week rotation, the student is expected to be proficient in taking an ocular history and performing a complete eye exam including slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy.

All students interested in this senior elective must meet with Dr. John Lind or Dr. Morton Smith in March of year WUMS III.  The final grade of the student is determined by input from the director of the particular service(s) through which the student rotated, plus the case presentations, plus scores on quizzes over required reading. The grades at Washington University are Honors, High Pass, Pass, Fail.

Student time distribution: Inpatient 5%; Outpatient 80%; Conferences/ Lectures 15%; Subspecialty Care 100%
Major teaching responsibility: Attendings, fellows and residents
Patients seen/weekly: At least 25, usually more
On call/weekend responsibility: yes / yes- call schedule will be finalized on day one of the rotation.

M50 816 / AWAY ROTATION IN OPHTHALMOLOGY
Instructor(s): John T. Lind, MD, MS, lindj@vision.wustl.edu, and Morton E. Smith, MD
Location: McMillan Hospital, Room 114, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, South Campus
Elective Contact: Mary Carnoali, 314-362-4418

Other Information: All students interested in this away elective must apply through VSAS and then be formally invited to enroll.
Enrollment limit per period: 6
Valid start weeks:  September 2016

This four-week elective is for senior students from medical schools across the United States who are in good standing at their home institution and who are planning to apply for a residency in ophthalmology. To enroll in this elective students must first apply online for the elective via the visiting student application service (VSAS). These applications will be reviewed and invitations will then be sent to individuals to enroll in the elective. Due to large demand, not all eligible away students will be accepted for the rotation. The dates for this elective are not flexible.

The students will rotate through the resident eye clinic and the subspecialty clinics of the full time faculty of the Washington University Medical School Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (e.g., neuro-ophthalmology service, cornea/external disease service, etc.). In exchange for a refundable deposit, students may opt to check-out indirect ophthalmoscopy lenses that may be used for the month to facilitate the acquisition of fundoscopy skills.

During the rotation the student’s responsibilities range from observation (including observing surgery) to working at a resident level and completing full eye examinations. Didactics will include weekly case presentation sessions to Dr. John Lind or Dr. Morton Smith, weekly attendance at grand rounds, and a mix of medical student-oriented and resident-oriented conferences. Also, there will be medical student-oriented workshops to learn the basics of the slit lamp and indirect ophthalmoscopy.

On day one, students will receive a schedule of conferences that they are expected to attend during the month. By the end of the four-week rotation, the student is expected to be proficient in taking an ocular history and performing a complete eye exam including slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy.

The final grade of the student is determined by the course director with input from the residents, fellows, and faculty members of the particular service(s) through which the student rotated.

Student time distribution: Inpatient 15%; Outpatient 70%; Conferences/ Lectures 15%; Subspecialty Care 100%
Major teaching responsibility: Attendings, fellows, and residents
Patients seen/weekly: At least 25, usually more
On call/weekend responsibility: No call responsibility. Very rare weekend responsibility.